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Graduate Field Faculty

Mark Bridgen

Mark Bridgen

Professor; Director, Long Island Horticultural Research and Extension Center
Research interests are in the areas of new plant development and breeding, plant environment interactions, plant cell and tissue culture, in vitro plant breeding, plant propagation, genetic modifications for plant improvement, and plant growth and development of ornamental plants.
Susan Brown

Susan Brown

Professor
The apple breeding program at Cornell is one of the largest fruit breeding programs in the world. Susan Brown's objectives include the development of new superior varieties for the apple industry with unique flavors, exceptional crispness, enhanced storage and shelf life, and the incorporation of resistance to disease and insect pests, and training students in the science of fruit breeding and genetics.
Edward Buckler

Edward S. Buckler

Adjunct Professor
The Buckler  Lab for Maize Genetics and Diversity uses functional genomic approaches to dissect complex traits in maize, biofuel grasses, and grapes. We exploit the natural diversity of these plant genomes to identify the individual nucleotides responsible for complex (quantitative) variation.
 
Ronnie Coffman

Ronnie Coffman

Andrew H. & James S. Tisch Distinguished University Professor
Ronnie Coffman serves as International Professor of Plant Breeding and Director of International Programs of the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at Cornell University. Coffman's work has been important to the development of improved rice varieties grown on several million hectares throughout the world. He has collaborated extensively with institutions in the developing world and has served as a board member for several international institutes.
Walter De Jong

Walter De Jong

Associate Professor
Walter De Jong's research centers around the genetic improvement of potato, both by conventional and molecular genetic means. Our breeding program aims to develop new chipping and tablestock varieties that are adapted to the Northeast and meet ever-changing needs of the regional potato industry.

Jeff J. Doyle

Professor
Chair, Plant Breeding and Genetics Section        
Jeff Doyle's work focuses on polyploidy (whole genome duplication), addressing questions of evolutionary pattern and process, gene expression, and genome evolution associated with this important phenomenon. Study systems have included a wide range of plant species, many of them cultivated or weedy, but most work in the lab has centered on the large and economically important legume family (“beans”). Legume projects have involved alfalfa and mungbean, but most work has focused on the wild perennial relatives of soybean (Glycine subgenus Glycine), including the development of a recently formed allopolyploid complex as a model for studying genome merger and duplication. Legume phylogeny and the origin and evolution of symbiotic nitrogen fixation (nodulation) has been an additional interest of the lab. 
The focus of research in the Giovannoni Laboratory is molecular and genetic analysis of fruit ripening and related signal transduction systems with emphasis on the relationship of fruit ripening to nutritional quality. They are also involved in development of tools for genomics of the Solanaceae including participation in the International Tomato Sequencing Project.

Michael Gore

Associate Professor
Michael Gore's expertise is in the field of quantitative genetics and genomics, especially the genetic dissection of metabolic seed traits related to nutritional quality. He also contributes to the development and application of field-based, high-throughput phenotyping tools for plant breeding and genetics research. He teaches two short courses at the Tucson Winter Plant Breeding Institute in Tucson, Arizona, and serves on the editorial boards of Crop Science and Theoretical and Applied Genetics.
Phillip Griffiths

Phillip Griffiths

Associate Professor
The vegetable improvement program at Geneva focuses on the breeding and genetics of common bean, crucifer and tomato crops. The goals include the introgression of host plant resistance to economically important pests, tolerance to environmental stresses and the selection of niche-market crops and traits.

Jean-Luc Jannink

Adjunct Professor
Jean-Luc Jannink's primary focus is on developing statistical methods to use DNA markers in public sector small grains breeding.  To make the research relevant to small grains, it should emphasize low cost markers to the extent possible because small grains have relatively low value. To make the research relevant to the public sector, it should be applicable to many relatively little programs that seek to leverage their joint efforts into something greater.
Li Li

Li Li

Adjunct Professor
Li Li’s research projects are in a number of areas (carotenoids, flavonoids, and micronutrients) associated with crop nutritional quality improvement. Primary research focuses on carotenoid metabolism.
Michael Mazourek

Michael R Mazourek

Associate Professor
The overall theme of Michael Mazourek's program is innovation of vegetables for adaptation for production in the Northeastern US and to be of improved quality and nutrition for consumers. He conducts much of this selection in Organic systems that represenst a more natural environment. By working in a natural environment, he is better able to draw parallels between the artificial selection that takes place in plant breeding with the natural selection that has taken place during the evolution of crop progenitors.
Susan McCouch

Susan McCouch

Professor
Susan McCouch's research focuses on rice and includes publication of the first molecular map of the rice genome in 1988, early QTL studies on disease resistance, drought tolerance, maturity and yield, cloning of genes underlying domestication traits, and demonstrating that low-yielding wild and exotic Oryza species harbor genes that can enhance the performance of modern, high-yielding cultivars. Recently, she has used genome wide association studies (GWAS) to demonstrate that the different subpopulations of O. sativa have significantly different genetic architecture.
Martha Mutschler-Chu
Martha Mutschler-Chu is a vegetable breeder / geneticist working on tomato and long-day onion. Her areas of interest concern the genetic control of novel traits derived from wild species, the genetic control/physiological mechanisms underlying these novel traits and their use in vegetable improvement.
Rebecca Nelson

Rebecca Nelson

Professor
Rebecca Nelson's interests and objectives pertain to plant pathology, plant breeding and international agriculture. Her own research program is focused on understanding the ways in which plants defend themselves against pathogen attack.
Wojciech Pawlowski

Wojciech Pawlowski

Associate Professor
Wojtek Pawlowski's research group studies meiotic recombination using genetics, biochemistry and several advanced microscopy methods, such as restorative deconvolution, multiphoton excitation, and structured illumination microscopy.
Bruce Reisch

Bruce Reisch

Professor
Bruce Reisch specializes in the development of new wine and table grape varieties, as well as new grape breeding techniques. Since joining the Cornell faculty in 1980, his program has released eleven new grape varieties - eight wine grapes (cooperatively with the Dept. of Food Science and Technology) and three seedless table grapes. The grape breeding program continues to emphasize wine variety development with a strong emphasis on combining wine quality with disease resistance and cold tolerance.
Lawrence Smart

Lawrence Smart

Professor; and Program Leader
The research in Lawrence Smart's lab is focused on breeding, genetics, genomics, and physiology of shrub willow bioenergy crops. Shrub willow (Salix spp.) produce high yields of woody biomass when grown as a dedicated short-rotation crop on marginal or underutilized land. Willow stems are harvested every three years and the plants resprout after each cutback, making willow fields productive for more than 20 years.
Margaret Smith
Margaret E. Smith joined the faculty at Cornell University in 1987 in the College of Agriculture and Life Science’s Department of Plant Breeding and Genetics, focusing on corn breeding. Her research goal is to enhance our understanding of corn adaptation to marginal environments and develop genetic materials that will improve corn productivity and sustainability in such environments.
Mark E. Sorrells, M.E. Sorrells

Mark E. Sorrells, M.E. Sorrells

Fellow Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future; Fellow Cornell Institute for Food Systems
The Cornell Small Grains Project has a history of over 100 years of developing innovative approaches to crop improvement. Our research program utilizes appropriate technologies encompassing molecular genetics, physiology, pathology, and breeding to research strategies that contribute to the development of superior crop varieties.
Donald Viands

Donald Viands

Professor
Donald Viands leads the Cornell Forage Breeding Project to conduct genetic research and develop cool season, perennial forage cultivars with higher yield, multiple disease and insect resistances, and forage quality. His project also conducts research on use of perennial grasses and legumes as feedstocks for the biofuel industry.

Courtney Weber

Associate Professor
The primary goal of Courtney Weber's program is to develop improved berry varieties to better serve the needs of the New York industry. He is integrating new technologies with traditional breeding practices to investigate the fundamentals of disease and insect resistance and fruit quality.

Kenong Xu

Associate Professor
The goal of Kenong Xu's research program is to discover and characterize apple genes or gene networks controlling traits of horticultural and/or economic importance using tools of plant genomics. The research findings of the program will (1) advance our knowledge in understanding the underlying mechanisms of these traits, and (2) enable us to develop and integrate efficient approaches and tools for the improvement of apple scion varieties and rootstocks.